The Commerce and Navigation of the Erythraean Sea: Being a Translation of the Periplus Maris ...

by John Watson McCrindle

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The commerce and navigation of the erythræan sea: Being a translation of the periplus maris erythræi by an anonymous writer and partly from Arrian’s account of the Voyage of Nearchus. Amsterdam: Pjhilo Press (1st reprint). Google Scholar.   Egyptian plus other ships on the Red Sea had to cope with what the unknown author of the Periplus of the Erythraean Sea (= PME= Voyage on the Erythraean Sea) called dangerous coral reefs. The Britannica refers to complex waters making Red Sea navigation difficult and dangerous.   The colour red occurs in the names of the Erythraean Sea (now the Persian Gulf), the Himyarite people of Yemen, the one-time Red Sea (called the Arabian Sea by Herodotus), the Phoenicians, etc. They mostly relate to Greek words to do with . The Periplus Maris Erythraei (Princeton ) , lines ) Any attempts by Alexandrian ships to sail beyond Aden were strongly discouraged; if they did sail, it was by laboriously hugging the coasts and in the words of Periplus, ‘sailing round the bays'.

The Periplus of the Erythraean Sea, also known by its Latin name as the Periplus Maris Erythraei, is a Greco-Roman periplus written in Koine Greek that describes navigation and trading opportunities from Roman Egyptian ports like Berenice Troglodytica along the coast of the Red Sea, and others along Horn of Africa, the Persian Gulf, Arabian Sea. The Commerce and Navigation of the Erythræan Sea: Being a Translation of the Periplus Maris Erythræi, by an Anonymous Writer, and of Arrian's Account of the Voyage of Nearkhos, from the Mouth of the Indus to the Head of the Persian Gulf, trans. by John Watson McCrindle (Gutenberg ebook). The commerce and navigation of the Erythraean Sea: being translations of the "Periplus maris Erythraei" by an anonymous writer and partly from Arrian’s account of the voyage of Nearkhos. Followed by Ancient India as described by Ktesias the Knidian: being a translation of the abridgement of his "Indika" by Photios and of the fragments of. The country of the Pandyas, Pandi Mandala, was described as Pandyan Mediterranea in the Periplus and Modura Regia Pandyan by Ptolemy. They also outlasted Byzantium's loss of the ports of Egypt and the Red Sea (c. CE) under the pressure of the Muslim conquests.

You can write a book review and share your experiences. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. Roman trade with India according to the Periplus Maris Erythraei, 1st century CE. Roman trade with India through the overland caravan routes via Anatolia and Persia, though at a relative trickle comparative to later times, antedated the southern trade route via the Red Sea and Monsoons which started around the beginning of the Common Era (CE. The Periplus of the Erythraean Sea, also known by its Latin name as the Periplus Maris Erythraei, is a Greco-Roman periplus written in Koine Greek that describes navigation and trading opportunities from Roman Egyptian ports like Berenice Troglodytica along the coast of the Red Sea, and others along Horn of Africa, the Persian Gulf, Arabian Sea and the Indian Ocean, including the modern-day. The waning influence of a Eurocentric paradigm paves the way for a close look at the maritime situation of the Indian subcontinent in the Indian Ocean during the first half of the second millennium C.E. Situated at the centre of the Indian Ocean, the two sea-boards of the subcontinent, along with Sri Lanka, appear in a wide variety of sources—literary (including letters of Jewish merchants.

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Full text of "The commerce and navigation of the Erythraean Sea; being a translation of the Periplus Maris Erythraei" See other formats. commerce and navigation of the erythrÆan sea; being a translation of the. periplus maris erythrÆi, by an anonymous writer, and of. arrian’s account of the voyage of nearkhos, from the mouth of the indus to the head of the persian gulf.

with introductions, commentary, notes, and index. by j. mccrindle, m.a. edin. The Commerce And Navigation Of The Erythræan Sea: Being A Translation Of The Periplus Maris Erythræi, By An Anonymous Writer, And Of Arrian's Account Of The Indus To The Head Of The Persian Gulf [Arrian] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

The Commerce And Navigation Of The Erythræan Sea: Being A Translation Of The Periplus Maris Erythræi. The Commerce and Navigation of the Erythræan Sea Being a Translation of the Periplus Maris Erythræi, by an Anonymous Writer, and of Arrian's Account of the Voyage of Nearkhos, from the Mouth of the Indus to the Head of the Persian Gulf Alternate Title:.

The commerce and navigation of the Erythraean Sea: being translations of the "Periplus maris Erythraei" by an anonymous writer and partly from Arrian's account of the voyage of Nearkhos ; followed by Ancient India as described by Ktesias the Knidian: being a translation of the abridgement of his "Indika" by Photios and of the fragments of that work preserved in other writers.

The commerce and navigation of the ErythrÆan Sea being a translation of the Periplus maris ErythrÆi, by an anonymous writer, and of Arrian's account of the voyage of Nearkhos, from the mouth of the Indus to the head of the Persian Gulf.

The Commerce and Navigation of the Erythraean Sea: Being a Translation of the Periplus Maris Erythraei by an Anonymous Writer, and of Arrian's Account of the Voyage of Nearkhos.

with Introductions, Commentary, Notes, and Index. For John Watson McCrindle's translation, see The Commerce and Navigation of the Erythraean Sea. Eggermont () noted that its translation is based upon an untrustworthy edition of the text and was only able to endorse Frisk 's French Le Périple de la Mer Erythrée suivi d'une Étude sur la Tradition et la Langue (Göteborgs Högskolas.

The Commerce and Navigation of the Erythraean Sea: Being a Translation of the Periplus Maris Erythraei by an Anonymous Writer, and of Arrian's Account of the Voyage of Nearkhos.

with Introductions, Commentary, Notes, and Index. Paperback; EnglishPages: Buy The Periplus Of The Erythraean Sea: Travel And Trade In The Indian Ocean By A Merchant Of The First Century by Schoff, Wilfred H (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders/5(8). The Periplus of the Erythraean Sea is a Roman period guide to trade and navigation in the Indian Ocean. Justly famous for offering a contemporary and descriptive account of early Indian Ocean Author: Eivind Heldaas Seland.

The Periplus of the Erythraean Sea is a short work of uncertain date and unknown authorship, written in very difficult Greek. It is concerned with the coasts of the Red Sea and |Indian Ocean and may be described as a combined trade directory and Admiralty Handbook, giving sailing directions and information about navigational hazards, harbours, imports and exports/5(4).

The Periplus Maris Erythraei, "Circumnavigation of the Red Sea," is the single most important source of information for ancient Rome's maritime trade in these waters (i.e., the Red Sea, Gulf of. The Commerce and Navigation of the Erythraean Sea. By J. McCrindle, M.A., LL.D., Calcutta, This volume contains a translation, with commentary) of the Periplus Erythraei Maris, by an unknown writer of the first Christian century, and of the second part of the Indika of Arrian.

⁠ ⁠. The Commerce and Navigation of the Erythræan Sea: Being a Translation of the Periplus Maris Erythræi, by an Anonymous Writer, and of Arrian's Account of the Voyage of Nearkhos, from the Mouth of the Indus to the Head of the Persian Gulf, trans.

by John Watson McCrindle (Gutenberg ebook) More items available under narrower terms. The Commerce and Navigation of the Erythraean Sea; Being a Translation of the Periplus Maris Erythraei by an Anonymous Writer, and of Arrian's Account of the Voyage of Nearkhos.

with Introductions, Commentary, Notes, and Index by. THE PERIPLUS OF THE ERYTHRAEAN SEA AND THE ARAB-PERSIAN GULF * The tentative issue of the present contribution is an attempt to clarify an obvious paradox: on the one hand, the Arab-Persian Gulf is totally absent from the most important historical source about trade between the West and India in the 1st cent.

A.D., 1 the Periplus Maris Erythraei, and on the other hand, continuous Cited by: Red Data Book, 3,4mphibia and Reptilia. Morges, IUCN. MCCRINDLE, J. (I ). The commerce and navigation of the Erythraean Sea; being a translation of the Periplus Marls Erythraei, by an anonymous writer, and of,4rrian's account of the voyage of Nearkhos, from the mouth of the Indus to the head of the Persian Gulf London, Trubner.

MOOItE Cited by: 9. Indo-Roman trade relations (see also the spice trade and incense road) was trade between the Indian subcontinent and the Roman Empire in Europe and the Mediterranean through the overland caravan routes via Asia Minor and the Middle East, though at a relative trickle compared to later times, antedated the southern trade route via the Red Sea and monsoons which started around the.

– The Commerce and Navigation of the Erythraean Sea; being a translation of the Periplus maris Erythraei, by an anonymous writer, and of Arrian’s account of the voyage of Nearchus.

Calcutta & L. (from IA 8,(the Periplus only), repr. together with McCrindleAmsterdam ). Zeila (Somali: Saylac, Arabic: زيلع ‎, romanized: Zaylaʿ), also known as Zaila or Zeyla, is a port city in the northwestern Awdal region of the Somalia.

In the Middle Ages, the Jewish traveller Benjamin of Tudela identified Zeila (or Zawilah) with the Biblical location of Havilah. Most modern scholars identify it with the site of Avalites mentioned in the 1st-century Greco-Roman Country: Somaliland. 20 The voyage of Nearchus from the Indus to the Euphrates (London, ); The Periplus of the Erythraean Sea (London, ) (non vidi); revised edition of both works: The commerce and navigation of the Ancients in the Indian Ocean 1–11 (London, ) (‘a subject which concerns the general interests of mankind ’ 1, p.

vii (dedication)).Cited by: A rutter is a mariner's handbook of written sailing directions. Before the advent of nautical charts, rutters were the primary store of geographic information for maritime navigation. It was known as a periplus ("sailing-around" book) in classical antiquity and a portolano ("port book") to medieval Italian sailors in the Mediterranean uese navigators of the 16th century called it a.

The Periplus of the Erythraean Sea was written by unnamed Romanized Alexandrian author in the first century A.D. The Periplus of the Erytheranean Sea provides with the shoreline information of the Red (Erythraean) Sea, starting from the port of Berenice to further beyond the Red Sea, the manuscript describes the coast of India as far as the.

Roman trade with India through the overland caravan routes via Anatolia and Persia, though at a relative trickle comparative to later times, antedated the southern trade route via the Red Sea and Monsoons which started around the beginning of the Common Era (CE) following the reign of Augustus and his conquest of Egypt.

Having extended the Empire's reach to the upper Nile, the Romans naturally. Topoi Suppl. 11 () p. The Coastal Arabia and the Adjacent Sea-Basins in the Periplus of the Erythraean Sea (Trade, Geography and Navigatio n) Very little can be said for sure about the author of the Periplus of the Erythraean Sea.

It is only more or less certain that he has composed this text between 40 and 70 of the 1st century ad : Michael D. Bukharin. Lionel Casson, The Periplus Maris Erythraei: Text With Introduction, Translation, and ton University Press, ISBN ; Chami, F.

“The Early Iron Age on Mafia island and its relationship with the mainland.”. Freedom of Trade Commerce and Intercourse The Constitution of India in Part XIII, wide Articles todeals with freedom of Trade, Commerce and Intercourse. Out of these articles, Article. It is most famously known from the title of The Periplus of the Erythraean Sea (1 st c.

A. D. Greek) by an unknown writer but whose name may have been “Diogenes”. Nor should it be overlooked that the “Red” Sea for Herodotus was what is now called the Gulf of Oman/Persian Gulf.According to the Periplus, numerous Greek seamen managed an intense trade with Muziris: Arikamedu.

The "Periplus Maris Erythraei" mentions a marketplace named Poduke (ch. 60), which G.W.B. Huntingford identified as possibly being Arikamedu in Tamil Nadu, a centre of early Chola trade (now part of Ariyankuppam), about 2 miles from the modern.Erythraean Gulf/Sea here means the Red Sea not the Erythraean Sea (= the western Indian Ocean) of the Periplus Maris Erythraei (= Voyage on the Indian Ocean = PME of the 1 st c.

A.D.) from the same Egypto/Greek background as Cosmas Indicopleustes (6 th c. A.D.).